Cincinnati Cadet

A Carte de visite by Hoag & Quick of Cincinnati, Ohio, pictures a young man heavy caped overcoat covers the Chasseur-inspire uniform. The light tone of the material suggests the uniform was gray, and the style suggests that he is a military cadet

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Cincinnati Cadet

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Lookout Mountain Sentry

A federal private is seated on Lookout Mountain, his hat laying beside him. This spot was a favorite for soldiers, families and others touring the Chattanooga battlefield during the Civil War, and continues today.

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Lookout Mountain Sentry

Kilt Cap and Pipe

This gent, possibly a Scotsman based on his kilt cap, is captured in a double exposure photograph, or Photoshop 1860s style. The best brief explanation I’ve found is from an exhibit titled “Early Double Exposure Portraits” on lomography.com:

In the 1860’s photographers were looking for a way to boost their business. Because of this, they thought of a way to make the subjects appear twice in the photograph – thus the birth of double exposure. In the images presented here, you can see that the subject is seen twice in the photo but having a different position. To create this type of image, the photographer would shoot the subject in one position and then the subject must move swiftly to another position before the second image is taken. The photographers also used rotating lens caps and special plates to come up with these double-exposed images.

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Kilt Cap and Pipe

“Firsts” at Book Talk in Charlottesville

02Two “firsts” distinguished last night’s discussion at the Senior Center in Charlottesville, Va.

For the first time in the all the presentations I’ve made, this was focused on a book yet to be completed—my navy volume. Although the manuscript will not be completed until the end of the year, I am comfortably past the halfway point. The talk provided me an early opportunity to build a Powerpoint and begin to talk publicly about the sailors at the heart of the volume.

For the first time ever, I was late. I allowed an extra hour for travel and it was not enough. Numerous slow-downs for police activity caused me to be six minutes late. Host Rick Britton, always the gentleman, kept the crowd engaged until my arrival.

A huge thanks to Rick and all those who attended for their patience, warm welcome, and good questions. Also thanks to Bill Krause, a Civil War living history impressionist. His ancestor, William B. Newman, was acting master on the warship “Southfield” in 1864. Captured at Plymouth, N.C., he spent the majority of the war as a prisoner.