Civil War Talk Radio Appearance

screen-shot-2016-12-07-at-9-58-07-pmDec. 7 is an appropriate day to discuss the navy, and so it was this evening at 7 pm ET when I appeared on Civil War Talk Radio with host Gerald Prokopowicz. We spent an hour talking about the history of photography, its impact on the American soldier, and the portraits and personal narratives of the 77 sailors featured in my new book, Faces of the Civil War Navies.
 
The episode began with sadness as Mr. Prokopowicz dedicated the show to Heidi, his standard poodle who recently passed. I did not have the opportunity to tell him about the pugs who have laid at my feet every morning for the last 16 years as I’ve written my books—Charlie, Brutus, Lucy, Missy and Bella. Only Bella is here with us now, though I will always hold the others close to my heart. For those of you who have made it to the acknowledgements section at the back of my books, the pugs are always mentioned.
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Book Review: A Chronicle of Diverse Nautical Service

faces-navy-200dpiToday’s Charlotte Observer includes a review by John David Smith, a professor of American History at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte, of my new book, Faces of the Civil War Navies.

The headline of the review reflects a sentiment shared by many who are enthusiasts of the water war from 1861 to 1865 and navy veterans of all stripes: Sailors who served in Civil War navies finally get their stories told.

Professor Smith notes, Faces of the Civil War Navies uses a stunning collection of cartes de visite and tintype images of Union and Confederate sailors to chronicle their diverse nautical service.

Delighted to read this and other positive comments from Professor Smith.

Reviewers of all my Faces books include a sampling of stories. It interests me to know which individuals they’ve decided to highlight. Professor Smith selected Landsman Aaron Joseph, a Boston man who went to war to fight for the freedom of his enslaved race, Lt. William Whittle Jr., a Virginian who served on the last Confederate vessel to surrender, and Lt. Cmdr. Richard Rush, a Pennsylvanian who went on to edit the monumental Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies.

Read the full review.