An Able New York Recruit

Albert Kendrick was recruited for the 35th in early 1862, after the regiment had been in uniform for about nine months of their 2-year enlistment. He joined in April 1862 as a private, and was steadily promoted through the year to second lieutenant. The Thirty-fifth participated in the battles of Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. The regiment mustered out of the army in June 1863—just a month before the Battle of Gettysburg.

His carte de visite is new to my collection, and now available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
An Able New York Recruit

Ed Bearss and “Faces of Gettysburg”

bearssI had the pleasure of speaking to a group gathered yesterday in Greencastle, Pa., for “1863—The Decisive Year of the Civil War.” The two-day event sponsored by the Allison-Antrim Museum and the Franklin County Visitors Bureau was coordinated by Ted Alexander, Chief Park Historian at the Antietam National Battlefield. My talk, “Faces of Gettysburg,” included a brief history of photography and capsule bios of 25 federals whose lives and military service intersected with the three-day Pennsylvania battle.

I arrived at the Green Grove Gardens Event Center about 3 p.m., and upon entering the building heard the distinctive booming voice of Ed Bearss, the Chief Historian Emeritus of the National Park Service perhaps best known for his appearance on the Ken Burns Civil War series. Bearss, who reviewed all three of my books, and I are pictured here soon after he finished his talk about Ulysses S. Grant.

Thanks to Ted for the invitation, and for the opportunity to share soldier stories and images.

New to My Collection: A Union Officer Wounded Four Times During the War

Francis Welch Crowninshield, known as “Crownie” to his friends, left Harvard during his sophomore year in 1861 and enlisted as a second lieutenant in the Second Massachusetts Infantry. Over the next four years, the regiment participated in some of the biggest battles of the war. Crowninshield suffered three wounds in action, including Winchester (May 25, 1862), Antietam (September 17, 1862), and Gettysburg (July 3, 1863). His fourth wound of the war occurred in Georgia at Raccoon Creek (June 6, 1864), when a guerilla shot him in the leg as he prepared to bathe in the stream. He barely survived his injuries, dying in 1866.

Crowninshield wears the shoulder straps of a first lieutenant and sits with a cane in this photograph taken in late 1862, when he was at home in Massachusetts recovering from a severe leg wound received during the Battle of Antietam.

His carte de visite portrait has been added to my Flickr Photostream:
Wounded Four Times in the Civil War