New on Disunion: An Orange Blossom in the Devil’s Den

DisunionMy latest contribution is now available. The source of the story and the photo is Sean R. Otis, who made contact with me on my Facebook page. I am much obliged to Sean for his efforts.

An excerpt from the story of Capt. Isaac Nicoll:

Nancy and George Hoover looked on as rebels traipsed through the couple’s modest Pennsylvania farm during the days immediately following the Battle of Gettysburg. The disappointed, yet still defiant, Confederates camped in the fields around the Hoover homestead near Waynesboro, about 20 miles west of the battlefield.

On Monday, July 6, 1863, a band of officers entered the Hoover house and made themselves comfortable. Mrs. Hoover later told a local historian that they “were seated at Mr. Hoover’s table partaking of his hospitality, and discussing the great battle and pointing out the causes of their defeat and mistakes they made.”

At one point during the impromptu debate, Lt. Ransom W. Wood of the 20th Georgia Infantry reached into his coat and pulled out a Bible. He had picked the Testament from the pocket of a dead Yankee captain on the battlefield.

Read the full story.

Advertisements

The Underlying Truth in a Staged Image by a Gettysburg Photographer

Devil's DenAn excerpt from my guest post on The Johns Hopkins University Press Blog:

“I walked through Devil’s Den a few weeks ago with Chuck Myers, a veteran reporter and photographer for McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. A talented writer with a passion for history, Myers is a meticulous planner who leaves no stone unturned in his quest for information. Superintendent J. Robert Kirby of the National Park Service accompanied us. Kirby heads up operations at Gettysburg, and he is clearly at home there among the supersized boulders.”

Read the complete post.