An Able New York Recruit

Albert Kendrick was recruited for the 35th in early 1862, after the regiment had been in uniform for about nine months of their 2-year enlistment. He joined in April 1862 as a private, and was steadily promoted through the year to second lieutenant. The Thirty-fifth participated in the battles of Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. The regiment mustered out of the army in June 1863—just a month before the Battle of Gettysburg.

His carte de visite is new to my collection, and now available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
An Able New York Recruit

Union Comrades, Fellow Amputees

Four federal officers pose with their swords, and carry the visible effects of the human cost of war. Three of the men have suffered the amputation of the right arm, and the fourth the loss of a finger or fingers.

The identity of only one of these citizen soldiers is known. William A. McNulty (standing, right) served with the Tenth New York Infantry. He was wounded in action at the Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., on Dec. 12-15, 1862. The Tenth, also known as the “National Zouaves,” paid a heavy price at Fredericksburg: 15 killed and mortally wounded, and 53 wounded and missing.

This carte de visite is new to my collection, and is now available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr:
Union Comrades, Fellow Amputees