Girl Liberty

A girl with the hint of a smile wears a white dress wrapped with the Stars and Stripes. A second banner is attached to a stick that she grasps in her hand. Completing the costume is a liberty cap, which is emblematic of a slave’s manumission in ancient times and a symbol of freedom in young America. This carte de visite is from Morse’s Gallery of the Cumberland in Nashville, Tenn., circa 1864-1866.

This image is new to my collection, and available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Girl Liberty

Michigan Cavalryman

A richly toned carte de visite by Philbrook’s Gallery of Detroit, Mich., pictures a cavalry soldier who sits with legs crossed and saber at his side. A revenue stamp on the back of the mount dates this image from 1864-1866, during which time the federal government taxed photographs and other items to pay for the Civil War.

The state of Michigan organized eleven regiments of cavalry during the war. Four of these regiments, the First, Fifth, Sixth and Seventh, composed the Michigan Brigade, also known as the Wolverines. Commanded for a time by Gen. George Armstrong Custer, the brigade distinguished itself during the Battle of Gettysburg and other campaigns with the Army of the Potomac.

His image is new to my collection, and is now available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr:
Michigan Cavalryman