Girl Liberty

A girl with the hint of a smile wears a white dress wrapped with the Stars and Stripes. A second banner is attached to a stick that she grasps in her hand. Completing the costume is a liberty cap, which is emblematic of a slave’s manumission in ancient times and a symbol of freedom in young America. This carte de visite is from Morse’s Gallery of the Cumberland in Nashville, Tenn., circa 1864-1866.

This image is new to my collection, and available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Girl Liberty

“Hyde” as a Deep Sea Diver

The companion image to yesterday’s post is this carte de visite by an anonymous photographer. An individual wearing a Morse Diving Helmet and an insulated suit stands in a photographer’s studio. A modern pencil identification on the back of the mount of this image names this diver as “Hyde,” and is associated with a tintype of a man in the uniform of a Union sailor. According to a previous owner, the sailor’s first name is George. There is however no record of a George Hyde in the U.S. navy during the Civil War period.

This image is new to my collection, and available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr:
Deep Sea Diver

Navy Man “Hyde”

This tintype in a carte de visite mount by an anonymous photographer is identified in modern pencil on the back only as “Hyde.” This photo came with another image, a carte de visite of a man outfitted in a Civil War era deep-sea diving suit, his head and face covered with a Morse Diving Helmet. According to a previous owner of the photos, the sailor’s first name is George. There is however no record of a George Hyde in the U.S. navy during the Civil War period. If you know anything about a George Hyde who served in the Union navy between 1861-1865, please be in touch!

This image is new to my collection, and available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr:
Navy Man “Hyde”