Hidden Mother, Third Arm

Keeping an infant still for the 15 or so seconds required for a photographic exposure during the Civil War period often required a helpful hand from mom. In this carte de visite, by Seaver of Boston, Mass., the hand of the child’s mother can be seen wrapped around the baby’s waist.

This image is new to my collection and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Hidden Mother, Third Arm

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A Trio of Little Men

The suits worn by these three youngsters are in the same style and make as clothes worn by adults, a common practice of the times. In this case, the little boy pictured on the right holds a child’s version of a proper hat. The photograph, from the studio of Hovey & Moulton of Rome, N.Y., dates from the Civil War period.

This image is new to my collection and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
A Trio of Little Men

Maine Gentleman with Top Hat and Cane

A gentleman identified in period pencil as Joseph Miller strikes a casual pose with frock coat, top hat and cane. He stood for his likeness in the studio of B.F. Smith & Co. of Portland, Maine. The style of the mount and the fashion worn by this man dates the portrait to the Civil War period.

This image is new to my collection and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Maine Gentleman with Top Hat and Cane

Two Officers Strike a Pose of Authority

This carte de visite by prolific Tennessee photographer Theodore M. Schleier pictures two Union officers with muddy boots. They stand with swords drawn, a signal of authority over enlisted men. They are identified only as “Capt. Martin” and “Lt. Kile.”

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Two Officers Strike a Pose of Authority

Cincinnati Cadet

A Carte de visite by Hoag & Quick of Cincinnati, Ohio, pictures a young man heavy caped overcoat covers the Chasseur-inspire uniform. The light tone of the material suggests the uniform was gray, and the style suggests that he is a military cadet

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Cincinnati Cadet

Lookout Mountain Sentry

A federal private is seated on Lookout Mountain, his hat laying beside him. This spot was a favorite for soldiers, families and others touring the Chattanooga battlefield during the Civil War, and continues today.

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Lookout Mountain Sentry

Kilt Cap and Pipe

This gent, possibly a Scotsman based on his kilt cap, is captured in a double exposure photograph, or Photoshop 1860s style. The best brief explanation I’ve found is from an exhibit titled “Early Double Exposure Portraits” on lomography.com:

In the 1860’s photographers were looking for a way to boost their business. Because of this, they thought of a way to make the subjects appear twice in the photograph – thus the birth of double exposure. In the images presented here, you can see that the subject is seen twice in the photo but having a different position. To create this type of image, the photographer would shoot the subject in one position and then the subject must move swiftly to another position before the second image is taken. The photographers also used rotating lens caps and special plates to come up with these double-exposed images.

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Kilt Cap and Pipe

Photoshop, 1860s

This Union captain is captured in a double exposure photograph, or Photoshop 1860s style. The best brief explanation I’ve found is from an exhibit titled “Early Double Exposure Portraits” on lomography.com:

In the 1860’s photographers were looking for a way to boost their business. Because of this, they thought of a way to make the subjects appear twice in the photograph – thus the birth of double exposure. In the images presented here, you can see that the subject is seen twice in the photo but having a different position. To create this type of image, the photographer would shoot the subject in one position and then the subject must move swiftly to another position before the second image is taken. The photographers also used rotating lens caps and special plates to come up with these double-exposed images.

Learn more.

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Photoshop, 1860s style

Dr. Miller and His Family

A pencil inscription on the back of this carte de visite identifies the group as “Dr. Miller, wife & sisters.” The writing is post-Civil War, which suggests it was added at some point after the image was removed from an album. The album sleeve or index page at the front of the album likely contained the information. The lack of photographer’s back mark or any other information presents enormous challenges in tracing the origin of this particular physician. Dr. Miller’s wife is likely the woman standing behind him with her hand on his shoulder. His sisters sit in various states of repose around him. Each face is a study within itself.

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Dr. Miller and His Family

Women on an Ivy-Covered Porch

This carte de visite by B.H. Rounds of Cannelton, Ind., pictures two women framed by a wreath of ivy as they stand on a porch. One woman, perhaps the younger, lay her clasped hands on the shoulder of the older, and she rests an arm and hands on the well-worn rail. Cannelton, Ind., was home to Cannelton Cotton Mill. Built in 1849, it was at one time the largest industrial building in the U.S. west of the Allegheny Mountains.

This image is new to my collection, and is available on PinterestTumblr, and Flickr.
Women on an Ivy-Covered Porch